Posts Tagged ‘CEUs’

Choosing the Correct Continuing Education Program

Tuesday, December 13th, 2016

Posted December 13, 2016

Brian Bradley,
MS, LAT, ATC, CSCS

By Brian Bradley, MS, LAT, ATC, CSCS

Obtaining continuing education units (CEUs) can be a frustrating task, but it can also be very rewarding if done correctly. Start by changing your attitude about continuing education (CE). Don’t think about CE as an annoying, time-consuming tasks you are required to do in order to maintain your certification. Try to think of CE as an opportunity to improve your skills and become a better Athletic Trainer (AT).

1. Know what specific CEs you need for your certification and license

If you are an AT who was certified in 2015 or before, 50 CEUs (including at least 10 CEUs from the EBP category) are required by December 31, 2017. If you were certified in 2016, 25 CEUs (including at least 5 CEUs from the EBP category) are required by December 31, 2017Some states also require CEs with each license renewal, sometimes those including medical errors programs or attending live events. Make sure you account for these when scheduling your CE programs.

2. Find CEs that are aligned with your interests or position

For example: If you work with athletes who have prolonged symptoms after concussions, it may be beneficial to attend a seminar in which they cover sub-maximal graded treadmill exercise.

3. Look for CEs that may make you more marketable in the future

Consider taking CE programs that add to your resume and clinical tool kit. Not only may it make you a better clinician, but it may help you land a job in the future.

4. Look for CEs that may satisfy requirements for multiple certifications

If you are an AT certified as a strength and conditioning specialist, look for a class you can use for both certifications.

5. Don’t wait until the December 2017 of a reporting period to get your CEs

Don’t wait to get your CE completed. The danger of waiting until this last minute is that there may not be any classes that fit into your schedule.

6. Look for CEs your employer will reimburse

Paying for CEs can get expensive but sometimes employers will provide their employees a CE budget.

7. Use CEs as a chance to network

Think about attending a seminar that offers CEs for multiple professions (RN, PT, EMT, etc.). This will help other professionals get to know the athletic training profession.

8. Attend a National or Local Athletic Training Meeting

Get to know other ATs in your state or district. Usually these meetings offer a lot of CEs and cover topics that directly impact you.

9. Use CE Course as an Excuse to Travel

Attend a seminar or course in someplace you have never been. Plan your trip to add a day or 2 to sightsee and experience a new location.

If you’re struggling with CEUs, remember the BOC website has a list of live events and home study programs to help you meet your CE requirements. Find CEUs on the BOC website at www.bocatc.org/findCE. You can also check the career education section of the NATA website at https://www.nata.org/career-education/education/online-ceu-opportunities.

Resources

www.bocatc.org/findCE

https://www.nata.org/career-education/education/online-ceu-opportunities

About the Author

Brian Bradley has been a BOC Certified Athletic Trainer since 2008. He is originally from Lawrence, Massachusetts but now live in Orlando, Florida. Bradley earned his undergraduate degree at Merrimack College in North Andover, Massachusetts and his master’s degree at the University of Florida. Bradley has worked in a variety of settings including professional, collegiate and secondary schools and in a physical therapy clinic. He currently works at Orlando Orthopaedic Center in the durable medical equipment (DME) department.  In his spare time, Bradley spends time with his wife, Izzy, and his daughter, Abigail.  He is also a big Boston/New England fan and enjoys running.

 

 

 

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Assess Your Individual Learning Strategies

Tuesday, November 24th, 2015

By Cherie Trimberger

Communications Coordinator

As an Athletic Trainer, you’ve spent years in school learning subject matter required for both your degree and BOC certification.  Throughout your education, it may not have occurred to you that your learning strategies might be different from the person sitting next to you.

Learning strategies are those techniques or specialized skills that the learner has developed to use in both formal and informal learning situations.1 There may have been subtle signs about your learning strategies, like your preference for a class or instructor, but you may not have really understood the reason behind your preferences.

Now as you work to finish your continuing education (CE) for the Board of Certification (BOC) reporting period ending December 31, 2015, it’s a good time to consider how your individual learning strategy could play a factor in your CE decisions.

For nearly 2 decades, educators studied the concept of learning styles to explore differences in learners with instruments to measure these differences.  Many in the field of adult education began to research the concept of learning strategies as a way to better understand individual differences among learners.1

Modern studies suggest that distinct groups of learners do exist. Inquiries at 2 universities in the United States led to research related to learning strategies and to the development of Assessing The Learning Strategies of AdultS (ATLAS).1  ATLAS can be used for self-assessment to quickly identify your approaches to learning a task.  According to Development of a user-friendly instrument for identifying the learning strategy of adults, ATLAS breaks down learners into 3 categories.

  • Navigators: Navigators are focused learners who chart a course for learning and follow it. These learners initiate a learning activity by looking externally at the utilization of resources that will help them accomplish the learning task and by immediately beginning to narrow and focus these resources.  Full description available at http://www.conti-creations.com/ATLAS_validity.pdf. (893-894)
  • Problem Solvers: Problem Solvers rely on critical thinking skills. Like Navigators, Problem Solvers initiate a learning activity by looking externally at available resources; however, instead of narrowing the options available, they immediately begin to generate alternatives based on these resources. Full description available at http://www.conti-creations.com/ATLAS_validity.pdf. (894)
  • Engagers: Engagers are passionate learners who love to learn, learn with feeling, and learn best when they are actively engaged in a meaningful manner with the learning task; ‘‘the key to learning is engagement – a relationship between the learner, the task or subject matter, the environment, and the teacher.’’ Full description available at http://www.conti-creations.com/ATLAS_validity.pdf.  (894)

Understanding your learning strategies can help when selecting your CE program.  Consider taking the ATLAS evaluation to better understand your individual learning strategies.  You can find the ATLAS evaluation here: http://www.conti-creations.com/atlas.htm.  The ATLAS evaluation is just one more tool you can use to help get the most out of your education.

 

Resources

http://www.conti-creations.com/ATLAS_validity.pdf

FAQ: What Approved Providers Need to Know About EBP Program Approval

Tuesday, December 2nd, 2014

As a current or aspiring BOC Approved Provider, you may have questions about how to offer BOC Approved Evidence Based Practice (EBP) Programs. Here are a few frequently asked questions with answers to help you through the application process.

Q: How do I apply for EBP program approval?

To be eligible for approval as an EBP event, the program must adhere to at least one of the following application formats: 1) Clinical EBP and/or 2) Foundations of EBP. There are three applications, one for each format and one for an integrated format that includes both clinical and foundations of EBP. Diversity among topics is encouraged in order to provide appropriate content for all clinicians relative to their level of expertise with EBP.

Q: What is the difference between Clinical EBP and Foundations of EBP Programs?

A: Clinical EBP programs are organized around a clinically oriented topic. Examples: Glenohumeral assessment, ACL rehabilitation, sport-related concussion. Foundations of EBP programs promote EBP within the profession by enhancing a clinician’s ability to find and evaluate evidence and apply it to their clinical practice; by defining EBP and how to use it; and by suggesting methods of integrating EBP into practice or teaching.

Q: How long does the EBP approval process take?

A: Providers will be notified of the initial application outcome within 10-16 weeks, depending on the length of the program and/or number of applications pending review.

Q: When does an EBP course expire?

A: Clinical EBP courses expire after two years. Foundations of EBP courses expire after five years. Course expiration date is always December 31st.

Q: What is considered “contemporary” experience on the EBP Faculty Qualification Form?

A: The term “contemporary” is not defined by dates. Qualified speakers must demonstrate current or recent examples of expertise.

Q: What format is required for the EBP home study course assessment?

A: As long as the evaluation activities demonstrate measurement of all learning outcomes of the course, the assessment can be varied and administered in an assortment of formats. For example:

  • - An exam using multiple choice questions and or other question formats. Questions would be based upon learning outcomes/content of the course.
  • - An EBP case study where students are asked to answer various questions based upon the case. Questions are related to course learning outcomes. These questions could be in a multiple choice or open-ended format.
  • - An assignment such as the following: The purpose of this assignment is three fold: 1) to demonstrate the ability to develop a clinical question using the PICO format, 2) to demonstrate the ability to search the CSR and other databases to find literature related to the clinical question and 3) to analyze, synthesize and create an outline of findings that answer the clinical question based upon the literature.
  • - Cochran Systematic Review/other databases: Participants will each develop a clinical question on a topic and research it using the Cochran library system and other databases. Students will develop an outline of their findings based upon the evidence.

New Year’s Resolutions for the AT Profession

Monday, December 30th, 2013

2013 is coming to a close, and the New Year is soon approaching. It’s time to start thinking about New Year’s resolutions. This year, put extra effort into something that betters you as a person as well as a professional and helps others along the way.

    1. SPREAD THE GOOD WORD about your profession. It’s called Public Relations. The thought of "being in the spotlight" may be intimidating to some, but PR is really very simple and many of you are doing it already. If you have summarized your job to friends, family or parents of student-athletes, that is PR. Speaking to students at a career fair or allowing them to job shadow you is PR. Communicating with the media on the sideline or promoting your profession through social media is PR. Interacting with the BOC’s social media on Facebook, Twitter and the BOC blog? That too is PR.For Athletic Trainers (ATs), March is coming quickly and March equals National Athletic Training Month (NATM). The 2014 theme is "We’ve Got Your Back." It is important for ATs to promote the profession and our knowledge and skill on a daily and weekly basis, but the month of March provides the opportunity to reach out to communities both in society and in the medical professions around us.
    2. EXERCISE YOUR BRAIN. Get a jump start on your CEUs. Even though the next recertification requirement deadline isn’t until December 31, 2015, waiting until the last minute to start your CEUs can be stressful. Start the year off right by identifying events you are interested in attending and try to organize the courses so that you are not overloaded in 2015. Learning is much more fun when you can choose what you want to learn about rather than be forced to complete a course because of the number of contact hours assigned. Learn more about maintaining your certification and the 2014-2015 changes.
    3. GET ENGAGED! Do you know about the latest happenings in your state? Many states have passed concussion legislation within the past year. Other states have passed licensure. Learn more about State Regulatory News.

The BOC is looking forward to an exciting year ahead, supporting you in the profession while providing new, value-added services for ATs and BOC Approved Providers.

Written By:
Brittney Ryba
BrittneyR@bocatc.org

Assess Your Professional Development

Monday, November 4th, 2013

As a reminder, ATs certified prior to 2013 need to complete their continuing education (CE) and recertification fee requirements by December 31, 2013.  The BOC offers a FREE service that can help you identify what areas you may need more knowledge and skills in to determine your CE needs before the deadline approaches.

The BOC’s Professional Development Needs Assessment (PDNA) is a tool intended to empower ATs of all experience levels to engage in self-reflection with the goal of assessing professional development needs across the domains of athletic training, as defined in the BOC Role Delineation Study/Practice Analysis, Sixth Edition (RD/PA6).  PDNA results are for personal use only and in no way impact current certification status.

If ATs need assistance with determining if a particular CE activity may be eligible for continuing education units (CEUs), the BOC has the free tool called the Individual Activity Review. This tool is a resource which can be used by all ATs, newly certified or experienced, to determine if CE activities meet BOC recertification requirements and fall within the domains of athletic training as defined in the RD/PA6.

Be Certain.™ to stay on target with your recertification goals. Read more about your certification information in the winter Cert Update, which will be in your mailbox this week.

Written By: Brittney Ryba
BrittneyR@bocatc.org