Posts Tagged ‘BOC exam’

Exam Security: Protect Athletic Training Candidates and Yourself

Thursday, January 26th, 2017

Posted January 26, 2017

Sharing is usually a good thing, but this is not the case when preparing students for the BOC exam or discussing it with them after. It is illegal and unethical to memorize and discuss questions that are on the BOC exam, and both candidates and Program Directors are reminded to keep exam information confidential.

Prior to sitting for the BOC exam, candidates agree in the Candidate Attestation to not disclose information about items or answers in any format to anyone. This includes, but is not limited to:

- Educators

- Past or future examinees

- Co-workers

- Test preparation companies

The Candidate Attestation asserts that no part of the exam may be copied or reproduced in any way before, during and after exam. This includes, but is not limited to, emailing, copying or printing electronic files, reconstructing content through memorization and/or dictation.

BOC exam content is exclusive copyrighted property of the BOC and protected by federal copyright laws. The BOC will prosecute violations of this agreement. Violation of the agreement is also a violation of BOC Standards of Professional Practice, which can result in suspension or revocation of certification, if applicable, or suspension or denial of a candidate’s eligibility for future exams. It can also do the same for a candidate’s colleagues.

The below table presents common scenarios that could violate exam confidentiality. Read on for guidance in each scenario. More information is also available in the BOC Exam Candidate Handbook.

Scenario When it’s OK When it’s not OK Bottom line

1. Educator asks candidates to “stop by” after the exam to “let me know how it went.”

If the invitation and the feedback to the educator relates to their general experience (“I thought the test was not as difficult as I expected…”).

This type of invitation from an educator may be misinterpreted by the candidate – and the student may think that the educator is asking the student to reveal copyrighted information.

If the candidate is asked to reveal questions or their answer options, then he or she will need to report the educator to the BOC. The educator should stop the candidate immediately from revealing any exam content, since doing so may subject both the candidate and educator to the BOC’s ethics process.

2. Candidate tells another candidate, “The test was very difficult – I felt like I didn’t have enough time.”

The candidate is simply telling another candidate how they felt about the exam. This is all right because the candidate is not revealing any of the questions or the answer options.

One candidate (or potential candidate) asks another candidate about the specific questions.

If the questions or answer options are shared, these individuals may find themselves part of a BOC ethics investigation and/or legal complaint.

3. Candidate to educator: “You didn’t teach me about this question that asked [specific question]. I felt unprepared.”

Never.

It is not all right and it will never be all right to reveal the BOC’s copyrighted questions (or answer options) to anyone.

Candidates sign documentation stating that they will not share exam questions, and the BOC expects the candidates to abide by this contract. Those who don’t may find themselves part of a BOC ethics investigation and/or legal complaint.

4. A future candidate learns from a past candidate that, "Your BOC exam will have both multiple choice and the new multiple response kind of items. I think there were a little over 100 questions on each session.”

Candidates are welcome to discuss any information that is found on the BOC website, including the TYPES of items used on the various exams.

If the conversation goes beyond exam format and the past candidate begins to describe exam questions and answers to the future exam-taker, a breach of ethics has occurred.

As long as the conversation is limited to public information that anyone can read on the BOC website, such as exam format and style of item presentation, there is no problem. However, the past candidate should refrain from sharing specific exam content with the future candidate to protect not only the past exam-taker but also the future one.

5. A future candidate is in class when the professor announces, "Everyone pay attention to this example. It came from a BOC exam. It will show up on another exam someday soon." In another class, the professor insisted that, "This is ALWAYS guaranteed to be a BOC exam question. This is one concept that you don’t want to forget.”

There is no acceptable circumstance in which it is OK for an educator to offer to any class or audience any item or material directly linked to any BOC exam.

Since all BOC exam material including all items (questions and answers) is copyrighted, it is illegal for anyone to reproduce and use these items in any manner whatsoever. Candidate exposure to BOC exam items is legally and ethically limited to candidates' time spent taking BOC exams. Sample items available on the BOC website are not active items and may be shared.

All candidates should be aware that unsolicited classroom exposure to BOC exam material may result in cancellation of their own exam scores and/or may lead to being barred from taking the BOC exam in the future. It also should be remembered that new exam items constantly are being generated and can deal with any topic in the BOC practice analysis.

Sources: Scenarios 1-3 are from American Registry of Radiologic Technologists. Scenarios 4 and 5 are from National Board of Examiners in Optometry, Inc. Content has been adapted for the BOC.

How I Studied for the BOC Exam

Tuesday, May 17th, 2016

Posted May 17, 2016

Elishia Jackson
LAT, ATC
https://www.linkedin.com/in/elishiajackson

By Elishia Jackson, LAT, ATC

You were admitted to an athletic training program, spent hours with your head in text books and reviewing notes, and spent more hours observing and working with BOC Certified Athletic Trainers (ATs) to get your athletic training clinical hours. Now it is senior year and time to start studying for, quite possibly, the most important exam you’ll ever take, the BOC exam. If you’re nervous, don’t worry, that’s normal!

The first thing I had to remind myself was that, in actuality, the past 3 years in my AT program I have been studying for the exam. Everything I learned in classes and in the clinic have prepared me for the BOC exam and the professional world. Therefore, I collected past notes, exams and lab papers. Luckily, most of my documents were already organized into a very large binder – my athletic training “hero,” as I like to call it. I began there by reading and reviewing all that I had collected.

Another tool I used was Principles of Athletic Training – A Competency Based Approach by William E. Prentice. This was the first athletic training book I purchased when I started my athletic training program. I used it for reference throughout my time as an undergraduate, and I still continue to use it as an AT. With this book, I decided to start from the very beginning and read or scan through it from cover to cover and make note of concepts and topics I wasn’t comfortable with. Afterwards, I went back through and spent time reviewing and studying those topics more in depth until I felt confident with them.

I did also find it very helpful to utilize the sample exam questions and exam development and scoring from the BOC website. They offer 25 sample exam questions formatted in the exact way you will see them on the real exam. This was especially helpful because I felt more prepared knowing what to expect, including all the question formats, buttons to click for going to the next question, and answering the question or flagging the question to come back to at a later time. Find these and other BOC study tools here: http://www.bocatc.org/candidates/exam-preparation-tools

I dedicated about a week of study time to reading and reviewing the NATA Position Statements and Code of Ethics. These are important to know not only for the exam but for your future career as an AT.

NATA Position Statements: http://www.nata.org/news-publications/pressroom/statements/position

NATA Code of Ethics: http://www.nata.org/membership/about-membership/member-resources/code-of-ethics

When it comes down to it, everyone learns and studies differently. This is what worked for me, and I hope it gives you an idea of how you want to study for your own exam. Good luck!

About the Author

Elishia Jackson is originally from the small town of Orting in Washington State. She earned her Bachelor of Science in Athletic Training with a minor in Coaching from Eastern Washington University in 2015. Jackson has experience with athletic training at the collegiate level (NCAA and NAIA), and high school level. Her passion for athletic training stemmed from her time as a junior level Olympic gymnast. Jackson suffered multiple injuries including a career ending neck injury. She believes working in the athletic training profession is a way to help others achieve their goals and dreams. In the future, she hopes to be able to enter back into the world of gymnastics as an Athletic Trainer.

 

VIDEO: An inside look at the BOC exam

Wednesday, January 6th, 2016

BOC staff members discuss key issues particularly relevant to students who are preparing for the BOC exam and certification. The presentation also includes questions from the students in the audience.

Check out and share the video for information on these topics and more:
• BOC partners
• Overview of the BOC exam
• BOC exam scoring
• Candidate resources
• Transitioning from a candidate to an AT
• Professional practice and responsibility

Enjoy the presentation. We hope it is useful to you!

Program Director Highlights: Christine Odell

Tuesday, March 18th, 2014

Program Director Highlights from the Spring 2014 PD Update Program Director – Christine Odell
Metropolitan State University of Denver

1) What is the name of your institution? 

Metropolitan State University of Denver

2) How long have you been a PD at this institution? Seven years

3) How many students are currently in your program(s)? There are 32 students in the clinical portion.

4) Do you teach any class(es)?  If so, which one(s)? I teach Upper Extremity Injury Evaluation, Foundations of Athletic Health Care, Anatomical Kinesiology, General Medical Topics in Athletic Training, Therapeutic Modalities in Athletic Training and Administrative and Research Topics in Athletic Training.

5) Do you use the BOC Self Assessment Exam(s) as tools to assist your students in preparing for the exam? How? Yes. I encourage my students to purchase at least one, and I use the small free example to show students how questions are formatted. We go through these as a group and discuss how the question is written. I try to focus their attention away from wanting to know their ‘score’ on these exams.

6) How do you prepare your students for the BOC exam?

I actually bring up the BOC web site and I do NOT log in. I then take them through all the information that is public. I start with the Candidate Handbook, move to the scheduling area and then the style guide. We discuss the style guide in depth. After this, all students are required to purchase the RD/PA6 because we use it to create assignments. I do not hold study/review sessions. I only hold reviews in content delivery. I feel when they reach this point, they have to learn how to organize their own studying. Therefore, my job is to focus on what they cannot control: knowing what they can and cannot take into the exam room, how the exam is formatted, etc. I take that unknown out of the equation so they can focus on studying the actual content.

7) What study materials do you recommend to your students? I recommend all the text books used in our curriculum and having access to the RD/PA6 and a good medical dictionary – either Tabor’s or Steadman’s. Otherwise I feel it is very overwhelming for students.

8) Please provide some tips for how you prepare your students for entering the real world (e.g. completing the BOC paperwork post-exam; state licensure/registration/certification; NPI numbers).

During the admin class this is actually one of our final discussions. I go over the BOC web site again and go through the "Certified" section and log in with my credentials and show them what I have to do.

9) Do you have any tips, suggestions or questions for other PDs? If you have not already, explore the BOC web page. It holds all essential information. If you do not understand something, call the BOC office. It is always surprising when you think you have very unique situation and they say, "It happens all the time. Here is what you need to do…"  They are extremely approachable and helpful.

If you are a PD who would like to be considered for inclusion in the Featured Program Highlights, please submit an email with your interest to StacyA@bocatc.org.

 

Program Director Highlights: Valerie W. Herzog

Monday, September 9th, 2013

Program Director Highlights from the August 2013 PD Update
Program Director - Valerie W. Herzog, EdD, LAT, ATC
Weber State University

1) How long have you been a PD at Weber State University?

I have been a PD here for eight years.

2) How many students are currently in your program(s)?

There are 40 undergraduate students and 31 master’s level students.

3) Do you teach any classes? If so, which one(s)?

Yes, I teach Basic Rehabilitation for Musculoskeletal Injuries, Advanced Rehabilitation for Musculoskeletal Injuries, Research Methods II and III, Administration and Management in Athletic Training, and our BOC exam prep courses (undergraduate and graduate).

4) Do you use the BOC Self Assessment Exam(s) as tools to assist your students in preparing for the exam? How?

Yes, I encourage the students to take the exams online to identify their weaker areas.

5) How do you prepare your students for the BOC exam?

In the BOC exam preparation class, students complete a set of practice questions each week. I encourage students to create a running list of every word, phrase and/or concept that they are not fully confident about. I then ask them to use that list to study from, by researching and reading about everything they were unsure of. I explain that one of the mistakes students make is to continually study the content they already know well. Instead, I encourage them to focus on the content they don’t know.

Completing large amounts of practice questions helps them identify things they don’t know well. In class each week, we review the questions that they were assigned to complete and discuss the content as needed. The students then have a week to take a quiz on the same content areas, although they see different questions. During the following wing class period, we review the quizzes in class.

The students also go through all of the Athletic Training Education Competencies and rate their level of confidence/knowledge on each on a scale of 1-10. I tally all of the scores together to determine the weakest areas for the class as a whole. Students are then assigned two to four competencies that were rated the lowest overall to research and create digital flashcards (using the app, “Flashcards Deluxe”) for study tools that are used by the whole class.

6) What study materials do you recommend to your students?

We have tried a variety of exam prep books with varying success. In the fall, we’re going to try a newer book, Athletic Training Exam Review: A Student Guide to Success, by Lynn Van Ost.

7) Please provide some tips for how you prepare your students for entering the real world (e.g. completing the BOC paperwork post-exam; state licensure/registration/ certification; NPI numbers).

In the BOC exam prep class, I have a day set aside to discuss how to complete the certification process, how to get licensed/registered/certified in the state where they get hired, and NPI numbers. We also review continuing education requirements so that they understand how to maintain their credentials, as well as the disciplinary procedures. During the same semester, they are typically enrolled in our athletic training management course, where they are also discussing legal issues, ethics, career skills and a variety of other topics related to management in athletic training.

8) Do you have any tips, suggestions or questions for other PDs?

We weren’t sure about creating or requiring a BOC exam preparation course, but we are SO glad we did. It gives the students some structure while they study, with deadlines to study content areas. Students often think that they can study on their own, but it is always easier to put off studying for real deadlines in other courses where they receive grades. We have seen a much higher pass rate on the exam for students who took the course, and we are now requiring it of all students in both programs.

If you are a PD who would like to be considered for inclusion in the Featured Program Highlights, please submit an email with your interest to StacyA@bocatc.org.

Program Director Highlights: Melanie McGrath

Friday, August 30th, 2013

Program Director Highlights from the February 2013 PD Update
Program Director - Melanie McGrath, PhD, ATC
University of Nebraska at Omaha

1)    How many students are currently in your program(s)?

Currently, we have 37 students total. We have 22 in our undergraduate program, and 15 in our entry-level master’s program. We always have fewer students in the spring, as some of our undergraduates are eligible to graduate in December.

2)    Do you teach any class(es)? If so, which one(s)?

In the fall, I teach Rehabilitation Techniques in Athletic Training, and Topics in Sports Medicine. In the spring, I teach Introduction to Athletic Training, as well as Lower Extremity Evaluation. In the summer, I teach Advanced Orthopedic and Medical Aspects of Athletic Training.

3)    Do you use the BOC Self Assessment Exam(s) as tools to assist your students in preparing for the exam? How?

I was lucky enough to receive 30 vouchers for BOC Self Assessment Exams as payment for helping the BOC with a project a few years ago. I gave those to our graduating students, who used them to prepare for their BOC exam. I now strongly encourage all of our students to take at least one self assessment exam as they prepare for the BOC exam. I encourage our students to take it about 6-8 weeks in advance of their exam date, so that they can focus their studying on one or two key areas during those crucial final weeks prior to the exam. I find the feedback provided to the students after taking the self assessment exams truly helps our students as they study.

4)    How do you prepare your students for the BOC exam?

We begin our students’ preparation as soon as they begin their first athletic training class. We utilize question formats in our classroom exams that mimic the format of the BOC exam (multiple choice, multiple select, drag and-drop matching, etc.). I provide the Reference List from the BOC exam to our library annually, to ensure that our students have access to every textbook utilized during preparation.

Our entry-level master’s students take a comprehensive exam during their final semester, and we prepare that exam so it aligns with the domains of athletic training used on the BOC (as a percentage of questions in each domain). We encourage our undergraduate students to also take this comprehensive exam to prepare for the BOC exam. Finally, we recently re-instituted BOC Study Sessions, led by our ATEP instructors, to review material during the spring semester of our students’ final year in the program. However, the most important preparation that our students have is simply passing all of their courses and clinical rotations.

5)    What study materials do you recommend to your students?

As a way to get the students started, I have them return to the most recent edition of “Arnheim’s Principles of Athletic Training” textbook, and use the questions at the end of each chapter. I find this is a simple way to initiate the study process for our students. I also advise them to reference the BOC Role Delineation Study, specifically Appendix A which lists the domains and the specific tasks, knowledge, and skills in each domain.

Then, I advise them to self-identify some areas they feel weak in, and I have them select the relevant texts from the BOC Exam Reference List, or I have them reference their class notes on that area. As they get closer to their exam date, I have them take a self-assessment, either the BOC Self Assessment Exams or the “Study Guide” from ACES. Finally, many of our students purchase the commercially-available “study guides” for the BOC exam. While these are not my first recommendation for study materials, the texts, quizzes and test banks seem to motivate our students to engage in the studying process.

6)    Please provide some tips for how you prepare your students for entering the real world (e.g. completing the BOC paperwork post-exam; state licensure/registration/certification; NPI numbers).

  • Make your transcript requests in advance. Most universities (including UNO) will allow you to request a transcript to be sent after your degree has been posted. If you request it early, you won’t have to worry about remembering to do it as you are moving, celebrating your graduation and transitioning into “the real world!”
  • Keep your CPR/AED cards in a safe location, and KEEP YOUR EXPIRED CARDS AS WELL! If the BOC audits your CEUs, you will need to provide evidence that you were continuously certified in CPR and AED. It is much easier to keep the cards than to ask the Red Cross or AHA to dig through their files and provide that information for you.
  • Prepare your licensure/registration application before you graduate, and have your supervising AT sign any documents before you graduate. Again, this saves time.
  • If you have a criminal conviction, start your BOC application process (and ultimately your licensure process) at least 6 months in advance of when you hope to take the exam (or have your licensure). This ensures that you can collect the necessary court documents - that process can take a considerable amount of time!
  • Most importantly, keep in contact with your PD, Clinical Coordinator, preceptors and fellow graduates. They will be very important during that first year: providing advice, helping you with licensure paperwork, providing references and helping you network with other ATs (who may, someday, want to hire you).
  • When you put someone down as a reference for a job, email that person to notify them and include a recent resume as well as the job description. That way, they will be prepared to answer any questions that may be asked during a reference check.

7)    Do you have any tips, suggestions or questions for other Program Directors?

In my first month as PD, the CAATE audited one of our programs. It was a real “trial by fire,” as I had to come up with all of the paperwork for a program I had literally just taken over! However, that experience really exposed me to the administrative side of my position, and I truly feel that it helped me transition much more quickly than I would have, had the audit not taken place.

So while I may not recommend an audit for new PDs, I would suggest immersing yourself in the administrative aspect immediately. Consolidate files, audit affiliation agreements and student files, revise policy and procedure manuals, and go through the CAATE Standards with a fine-tooth comb. Make it a goal to know exactly how you meet each CAATE Standard, and where that evidence is located, during your first semester. It will make your next annual report or self-study much easier!

If you are a PD who would like to be considered for inclusion in the Featured Program Highlights, please submit an email with your interest to StacyA@bocatc.org.

Transition from Candidate to Athletic Trainer

Wednesday, December 5th, 2012

This Week’s Question: I just passed the BOC exam! What is the next step?

Answer: Passing the BOC exam is just the first step. There are a few items you must submit to complete your file for certification before you can officially use the ATC® credential. Be Certain.™ that the following items have been submitted to complete your file for certification:

Official transcript – Mail your official transcript with degree and date of degree posted (upon graduation) in a university sealed envelope to:

Board of Certification
Attn: Credentialing Services Dept.
1415 Harney St Ste 200
Omaha NE 68102-2205

ECC card – A front and back signed copy of your current ECC card must be faxed or scanned and emailed to:

Fax: (402) 561-0598 (Attn: Credentialing Services Dept.)
Email: Exam@bocatc.org

You will receive an email notification that everything has been processed and that you have the go-ahead to use the credential. You can publicize your status as a BOC Certified Athletic Trainer (AT) by sending a press release to
your local newspaper or by posting it on Twitter. We also have certificates and plaques you can order to display your accomplishment. Visit the BOC website about more ideas on how to market your BOC certification.

For more information regarding the maintenance of your BOC certification and other responsibilities, read Transition from Candidate to AT  on the BOC website. We encourage you to watch the short video Your Credential, Your Responsibility on the BOC’s YouTube Channel.

Currently, there are 48 states that have some form of athletic training regulation. The BOC exam is accepted to obtain regulation in all 48 states; however, it is important to recognize that passing the BOC exam is only a precursor to athletic training practice. Compliance with state regulatory requirements is mandatory and the only avenue to legal athletic training practice. For specific details regarding state regulation, please contact your state regulatory agency.

When using the credential, remember that ATC refers to the credential held by a Certified Athletic Trainer (AT). ATC should only be used when referring to the credential, and it should not be used in singular or plural form (ATC or ATCs) when referring to an individual Athletic Trainer (AT) or a group of Athletic Trainers (ATs). Read more about the proper presentation of credentials, degrees and licenses in this NATA News article Proper Treatment of Degrees, Licenses and Credentials.

Written By: Brittney Ryba
BrittneyR@bocatc.org

How Should I Prepare for the BOC Exam?

Friday, March 2nd, 2012

Did you know that the acronym FAQ was born at NASA? FAQ stands for “frequently asked question” and, here at the BOC, we want to address some recent questions that have been brought to our attention by ATs and candidates.
 
This Week's Question: “How should I prepare for the BOC exam?”
Answer: As Exam Development Coordinator, a week does not go by without candidates asking “how should I prepare for the exam”.  The BOC has multiple resources available to candidates and program directors.  Below are commonly utilized resources, all of which are available on the BOC website:

Exam Candidate Handbook:  This is the “key” document for candidates to understand all policies, procedures and information related to the exam.  Role Role Delineation/Practice Analysis Sixth Edition (RD/PA):  The RD/PA6 is the blueprint for the exam.  All exam items are written to the knowledge and skill statements under each task.  Each exam form is assembled to the proportions outlined in RD.  Ask yourself, “Am I comfortable with the content under each task in the RD?”  If not, focus on your weaknesses.

Sample Exam:  The BOC has prepared sample items for each exam part to familiarize candidates with the look and feel of the computer interface and its navigation tools.

Self Assessment Exams:  75 item online self assessment exams are available to students preparing for the BOC exam.  Content experts who develop the BOC exam wrote the questions in these self assessment exams, which help to determine areas of strength and weakness. This document outlines the standard terminology and abbreviations used on the exam.

Exam Reference List:  This is the list of references used to write the items used on the exam.

Power Points on Exam Development:  We have several past presentations on the exam and exam development posted on our web-site for review.

YouTube: Once you pass the BOC exam, what do you do? There are a few items you must submit to complete your file for certification before you can officially use the ATC® credential. Watch the video I just passed the BOC exam!  What is the next step?

By reviewing the items listed above, you will begin to have a better understanding of the BOC Exam and be well on your way to a positive testing experience.

Written By: Chad Kinart, MS, ATC
ChadK@bocatc.org

The Many Ways the BOC Shows Love to Stakeholders

Friday, August 5th, 2011

While reading Associations Now Ideas into Action, a publication by ASAE: The Center for Association Leadership, I came across an article called 33 Simple Ways to Build Member Loyalty (33 Ways to Love Your Members in the print edition), written by Joseph C. Issacs, CAE, and Vinay Kumar.  I was excited to see what tips they offered to membership organizations.  As I read this I became more and more proud that the BOC already partakes in many of the suggested ways to promote meaningful and memorable relationships with our stakeholders. BOC shows love to our stakeholders by:

Sending Handwritten Thank You Notes.  The BOC shows appreciation with thank you cards signed by all staff members for thoughtful gestures.  Check out the BOC Facebook to see the delicious fruit bouquet sent from BOC volunteer & BOC Board Public Director, Amy DeRosa, in honor of the BOC's 22nd Birthday.

Listening. Staff members take the time to listen to our members. Stakeholders can share their thoughts through blog posts, e-mail, letter, phone, social media and surveys.  Concerns and new ideas are forwarded to BOC committees and the BOC Board of Directors for consideration. Let your voice be heard!

Keeping an Open House. The BOC welcomes all stakeholders to visit our office at 1415 Harney Street in Downtown Omaha.  Our restored building is impressive and eye catching. Within the last year we have hosted numerous events:  board and committee meetings, Mid-America Athletic Trainers’ Association Annual Meeting and Symposium open house, College World Series Athletic Trainer (AT) invite, BOC AT Regulatory Conference reception, BOC Christmas party. Stop on by, the door is always open!

Asking Questions. The BOC is always trying to get feedback from our stakeholders. Participating in discussions on blogs and social media or completing surveys helps us, help you.

Happy Birthday and Christmas cards. The BOC sends monthly birthday cards signed by all staff members to all BOC volunteers. Christmas cards are sent to BOC volunteers and vendors as well.

Sharing Information on a Stakeholder’s Interest. We keep in contact with our stakeholders through email, mail and social media.

Advancing Stakeholders’ Writing and Speaking Skills. We invite all stakeholders to be guest bloggers for the BOC blog.

Fostering Community. The BOC stays current on the great things our stakeholders accomplish. We recognize and share the news in the Kudos Korner and contribute news to various publications. Last winter, BOC staff also donated their time at a local shelter, putting together Christmas bags for boys and girls. 

Keeping You Informed. The BOC works to be transparent. We strive to share as much information as possible with stakeholders while keeping the public safe.

Making It Right! It isn’t easy blending customer service with regulatory affairs. Rules and regulations provide protection to the public, which includes the mission of the BOC.

Don’t Leave You Hanging! There are bumps in the road of life. BOC staff works to help you through tough times. Providing options for credential status or alternative ways to obtain CEUs are ways we can help.

Saving You Money. The BOC has Approved Providers who offer low or no-cost continuing education opportunities.

Getting Work Done Efficiently.  The BOC uses technology to work efficiently.  Software changes, simplifying process and providing communication are a few of the ways we work for you.

Being Honest.  It’s not easy to give bad news, but regulatory agencies are meant to protect the public. Honesty and transparency are two ways the BOC helps stakeholders know what the future may hold.

Keeping Our Promises. Do what you say, say what you do is my motto.

Celebrating Successes. BOC staff shares congratulatory salutations with stakeholders. Baby announcements, degrees, promotions, awards and other acknowledgements are recognized and celebrated.

Serving as a Sounding Board. The BOC often asks for your ideas and feedback. Your comments are given to the BOC Board of Directors.  Recall the survey about BOC CE Requirements you received last fall - we’re listening!

Personalizing Our Communications. BOC staff takes time to return communication quickly. Personal emails and letters are sent to stakeholders.  In our eyes, you are a name, not a number.

Offering How-To Guidance. Transparency is a value the BOC Board of Directors and office staff share. Offering options for tough situations, how to enter CE activities etc., is what we are here for.

Offering Links to Other Resources. Check out the BOC website. You will find information on a variety of topics from the BOC exam, CE, Regulatory Affairs, History, Volunteer Opportunities etc.

Going the Extra Mile. Whether we send email reminders because ATs are on the move or someone called the BOC office by mistake, we’ll help you get where you are going.

Acknowledging Achievements. Recognizing hard work and celebrating successes is what we’re good at. The Dan Libera Service Award, Public Advocacy Award, and Paul Grace Leadership Award recipients were just announced this summer. Find out who is doing what for our profession.

As you can see, the BOC loves our stakeholders.  We strive to create and maintain the best relationship with each and every stakeholder. 

Written by: Jessica O'Neel, MS Ed, ATC
JessicaO@bocatc.org

This Week's FAQs

Thursday, July 21st, 2011

Did you know that the acronym FAQ was born at NASA? FAQ stands for “frequently asked question” and, here at the BOC, we want to address some recent questions that have been brought to our attention by ATs and candidates.
 
This Week's Question: I just passed the BOC exam!  What is the next step?
Answer: Passing the BOC exam is just the first step.  There are a few items you must submit to complete your file for certification before you can officially use the ATC® credential.

Be Certain.™ that the following items have been submitted to complete your file for certification:

Official transcript - Mail your official transcript with degree and date of degree posted (upon graduation) in a university sealed envelope to:

Board of Certification
Attn: Credentialing Services Dept.
1415 Harney St Ste 200
Omaha NE  68102-2205

ECC card - A front and back signed copy of your current ECC card must be faxed or scanned and emailed to:

Fax: (402) 561-0598 (Attn: Credentialing Services Dept.)
Email: Exam@bocatc.org

You will receive an email notification that everything has been processed and that you have the go-ahead to use the credential. You can publicize your status as a BOC Certified Athletic Trainer (AT) by sending a press release to your local newspaper or by posting it on Twitter. We also have certificates and plaques you can order to display your accomplishment. Visit the BOC website about more ideas on how to market your BOC certification.

For more information regarding the maintenance of your BOC certification and other responsibilities, we encourage you to watch the short video Your Credential, Your Responsibility on the BOC’s YouTube Channel.

Currently, there are 48 states that have some form of athletic training regulation. The BOC exam is a requirement to obtain regulation in 46 of the 48 states; however, it is important to recognize that passing the BOC exam is only a precursor to athletic training practice. Compliance with state regulatory requirements is mandatory and the only avenue to legal athletic training practice. For specific details regarding state regulation, please contact your state regulatory agency.

When you start using the credential, remember that ATC refers to the credential held by a Certified Athletic Trainer (AT). ATC should only be used when referring to the credential, and it should not be used in singular or plural form (ATC or ATCs) when referring to an individual Athletic Trainer (AT) or a group of Athletic Trainers (ATs).