A Look into Concussion Protocols

Posted March 15, 2017

Nicole T. Wasylyk
MSEd, LAT, ATC

By Nicole T. Wasylyk, MSEd, LAT, ATC

Preventing, identifying and managing sport-related concussions (SRC) continues to be a challenge for both healthcare professionals and for patients. The complexity in management of SRC may be mitigated by adopting solid policies and procedures to follow for those involved with concussion care. Best practice for concussion management encourages all high schools, colleges, club and professional sports to have policies in place regarding SRCs.

Both the National Hockey League (NHL) and National Football League (NFL) have accepted policies1,2 with the NHL adopting a new mandatory protocol this season. The purpose of the protocols is to educate players and provide guidelines for identifying and managing sports-related concussions. It has been well publicized that both the NHL and NFL face litigation from former players accusing the leagues of failing to protect them from concussions and head injuries. They also allege the withholding of information about long-term effects of concussions.3,4 These new protocols may achieve improved player education, prevention and recognition of concussion.

At their core the protocols are very similar; the NHL and NFL reference the Zurich II Consensus Statement from 2012 to define concussion as a “brain injury and is defined as a complex pathophysiological process affecting the brain, induced by biomechanical forces.”5 The NHL’s protocol specifically states that all players must watch an educational video and received a brochure of the information prior to the first day of training camp. All players are also required to complete baseline concussion testing, a well-adopted best practice for all contact sport athletes. Players complete both the SCAT3 and ImPACT® Test, core components of baseline testing.

The protocols both take into account thoughtful details regarding baseline and follow-up concussion testing. For example, they recognize the importance of an appropriate baseline testing setting.  Baseline testing environment and timing of the test (not immediately after physical exertion) should be considered carefully.  It is crucial for these tests to be completed in an environment where a player has minimal distractions to ensure validity of these tests.

As both protocols describe baseline testing, they also describe recognition of sports-related concussion during game play and on-field management. Signs and symptoms of concussion are mentioned in detail along with the way each league monitors for concussions. During gameplay, the NHL utilizes 2 types of spotters or individuals who monitor game play for potential athletes who may have sustained a head injury.

The first type is a Central League Spotter described as an Athletic Trainer (AT) or athletic therapist who observes the games via multiple live game feeds in the NHL offices. The second is an In-Arena League Spotter described as an Off-Ice Official who observes the game live in the arena. If either spotter suspects a player has sustained a concussion the player is then taken off ice and assessed by the club’s medical personal as described in the protocol. In contrast, the NFL only describes a Booth Athletic Trainer; this individual serves as the spotter similar to the Central League Spotter for the NHL.

If an NFL player is suspected of having a concussion during a game, they are removed from play and assessed as described by the “Madden Rule.” This rule states that the player must be removed from the field and evaluated in the locker room area by medical personal. If medical staff concludes a concussion was sustained that player is not permitted to return to play the same day. If no concussion is suspected, then video of the game play must be reviewed to remove any doubt of head injury prior to allowing the player to return to participation. The NHL describes assessment similar to the NFL’s “Madden Rule.” Return to play progression is also outlined in both protocols and both leagues encourage a multidisciplinary team approach to treatment. The medical teams are comprised of either a neurotrauma consultant or neuropsychologist along with the team medical doctors and ATs.

These concussion protocols serve as a comprehensive approach to education, diagnosis and management of sports related concussions. It is important that a transparent policy is adopted as a part of best practice so players, coaches, medical staff and officials understand not only the actions to take to protect athletes but expectations surrounding concussion recognition, management and return to sport.

References

1.https://images.nflplayers.com/mediaResources/lyris/pdfs/NFL_Diagnosis_Mgmt_Concussion.pdf

2.https://nhl.bamcontent.com/images/assets/binary/282574512/binary-file/file.pdf

3.http://www.cbsnews.com/news/supreme-court-rejects-former-players-challenge-1-billion-nfl-concussion-settlement/

4.https://www.boston.com/sports/boston-bruins/2016/02/06/105-former-nhl-players-are-plaintiffs-in-class-action-concussion-lawsuit-against-league

5.http://bjsm.bmj.com/content/47/5/250.full

 

Resources

https://www.nata.org/sites/default/files/Concussion_Management_Position_Statement.pdf

http://www.bocatc.org/blog/athletic-trainers-in-the-news/concussion-baseline-assessments-what-should-clinicians-capture/

About the Author

Nicole Wasylyk works as an Athletic Trainer in a physician practice at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center (DHMC) in Lebanon, New Hampshire. Prior to DHMC she resided in Madison, Wisconsin and was an Athletic Trainer in a physician practice at Meriter-Unity Point Health. Wasylyk obtained her Bachelor of Science in Athletic Training from Boston University and Masters of Science in Education from Old Dominion University. She has completed a residency program for healthcare providers who extend the services of a physician at UW Health. Wasylyk also obtained her orthopedic technician certification. Her professional interests include injury surveillance and prevention, standardization of best practices and patient reported outcomes collection. 

 

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