Archive for December, 2016

Do You Really Know the ECC Requirement?

Thursday, December 22nd, 2016

Posted December 22, 2016

Avoid common audit problems like completing the wrong course, letting your ECC certification lapse or tossing old documents too soon.

The Card Code is highlighted in yellow.

The BOC regularly conducts audits of ATs to verify compliance with certification requirements – a critical part of assuring public safety. Our audits sometimes reveal lapses in maintaining an Emergency Cardiac Care (ECC) credential due to mistaken beliefs about the requirement. Other times, ATs report ECC certification at a lower level than the minimum BOC requirement (see sidebar).

Following are common but unacceptable reasons given for a lapse in ECC certification:

- I’m not currently practicing as an AT

- I’m not working in the field

- I’m in school

- I didn’t know what level of CPR I need

- I didn’t keep all my cards, whether expired or current

The Certificate ID is highlighted in yellow.

In an effort to help with lost cards, we have added a field to the continuing education reporting form in your BOC Central™ profile. The new field, under the “Emergency Cardiac Care (ECC)” section, asks for the certificate ID or card code (see screenshot).

This information allows the BOC and other organizations to access American Red Cross and American Heart Association systems to verify ECC certification – which allows us to help you in the event of an audit. We encourage you to enter ECC information in your as soon as you receive a new card or certificate.

What Level Is Your ECC Certification?

 ECC certification must include all of the following:

- Adult CPR

- Pediatric CPR

- Second rescuer CPR

- AED

- Airway obstruction

- Barrier devices (e.g., pocket mask, bag valve mask)

Full details of this category are located in the Certification Maintenance Requirements starting on page 3.

Finally, remember that ECC documents must be kept for 2 years after expiration. The only acceptable documents are original certification cards, original certificates of completion, or photocopies (front and back) of certification cards or certificates of completion. The instructor and card holder must sign cards or certificates of completion if a QR code is not provided. Letters provided by instructors are not acceptable.

 

 

Save

In-Depth Look: Assistant Athletic Trainer for The Original Harlem Globetrotters

Monday, December 19th, 2016

Posted December 19, 2016

Austin Burns, ATC is the Assistant Athletic Trainer for The Original Harlem Globetrotters. The Harlem Globetrotters are an exhibition basketball team that combines athletics, performing arts and comedy.

Describe your setting:

I work in a setting with a mixture of professional sports and performing arts.

How long have you worked in this setting?

I have worked in this setting for a little over a year and will be beginning my second tour this holiday season.

Describe your typical day:

Depending on the city we are playing in and how far we have to travel to the next city, my day will typically begin around 6:00am. We are usually on the bus by 8:00am and then off to the next location. After traveling for roughly 4 to5 hours, we check into our hotel and grab a quick lunch.

Afterwards, I head to the arena to meet up with our production and equipment truck. I’ll start by meeting with the arenas facility manager to locate the locker rooms and familiarize myself with the layout of the building. I’ll then help the truck driver unload all of my equipment and supplies; this is usually in a hallway somewhere.

The players, coaches and remaining staff arrive to the arena around 4:00pm and hold a walk through practice. At 5:00pm, I begin all of the pregame routines including stretching, taping, prehab exercise, and various other treatments depending on the needs of the athletes. At 6:45pm, the pregame entertainment begins so I’ll end all treatments and get changed for the show. The show starts at 7:00pm and runs for 2 hours.

During the show, my primary focus is no different than any other Athletic Trainer (AT). I manage acute injuries, perform wound care, make sure the athletes are hydrated and stay alert for anything out of the ordinary. Following the end of the show, the athletes have an autograph session for 20 minutes. I use this time to make ice bags, pack my equipment, load the truck and perform any additional treatments.

By 10:00pm, we are back on the bus and on our way to the hotel. Once in my room, I enter in the medical notes for the day and try to get to bed by 12:00am so I can repeat it all the next day.

What do you like about your position?

What I like most about my position is how creative and adaptive I have to be when working on location. Not having a designated room to perform treatments and exercise can be very challenging. Most days, I find myself performing corrective exercise and prehab on the bus, manual and soft tissue therapies in the hotel room and ice baths in the hotel room tubs. This can be difficult when working with athletes who are all over 6 feet 5 inches tall and can’t fit in the seats, beds or tubs.

What I also love about my position is getting to see the joy people experience when coming to one of our shows. So many children and adults leave the game smiling and laughing. To know you helped make that happen is really rewarding.

What do you dislike about your position?

The hardest part about the position is being on the road for 5 to6 months at a time. Being away from friends and family can start to take a toll on you. Fortunately, you begin to develop a small family with the athletes and staff involved in the production, which helps with the home sicknesses.

 What advice do you have about your practice setting for a young AT looking at this setting?

The advice I would give to any young AT looking at this setting would be to go for it!

Don’t think because you have only worked in football, baseball or basketball your whole career that you can’t tackle performing arts or any other setting. I have become a more well-rounded AT because I chose to challenge myself by working in new and different settings.

I was very nervous when I started in this position but am grateful I made the decision to take on this role.

 

 

Save

The Role of an Athletic Trainer in Managing Diabetes

Thursday, December 15th, 2016

Posted December 15, 2016

By Mackenzie Simmons, ATC

The theme for National Diabetes Month in November this year was “Managing Diabetes—It’s Not Easy, but it’s Worth it.” There are 2 important aspects to this theme that impacts the work of healthcare providers.

1. It serves as a reminder to all persons diagnosed with diabetes that they are not alone.

2. It serves to educate the population on the importance of managing diabetes correctly to prevent secondary complications including heart attack, stroke, kidney disease, vision loss and amputation.

It is important for healthcare professionals, along with members of the community, to be educated on the risk factors of diabetes as well as any issue that may arise due to improper management. As healthcare providers, Athletic Trainers (AT) have several important roles and responsibilities with diabetes management.

First and foremost, ATs need to educate patients, parents and coaches on what to look out for with hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. Also, having a treatment plan readily available, along with the patient’s emergency medical forms,  is essential incase an emergency arises. Establishing good rapport with the patient and their family is imperative to gain trust in the relationship.

There are also several tips ATs should provide to your patients with diabetes:

- Know your ABC’s including the following:

* A1C or blood test that measures the average blood sugar level over the past 3 months

* Blood pressure

* Cholesterol

- Get into a routine schedule with your eating habits and physical activity

- Know your blood sugar levels and what to do when they become too high or too low

- Establish a team of healthcare professionals who are able to provide support and answer questions

For more information on this topic, visit the following webpages:

http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/?loc=db-slabnav

http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/myths/?loc=db-slabnav

http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/?loc=lwd-slabnav

https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-communication-programs/ndep/partnership-community-outreach/national-diabetes-month/Pages/default.aspx

 

 

Save

Save

Choosing the Correct Continuing Education Program

Tuesday, December 13th, 2016

Posted December 13, 2016

Brian Bradley,
MS, LAT, ATC, CSCS

By Brian Bradley, MS, LAT, ATC, CSCS

Obtaining continuing education units (CEUs) can be a frustrating task, but it can also be very rewarding if done correctly. Start by changing your attitude about continuing education (CE). Don’t think about CE as an annoying, time-consuming tasks you are required to do in order to maintain your certification. Try to think of CE as an opportunity to improve your skills and become a better Athletic Trainer (AT).

1. Know what specific CEs you need for your certification and license

If you are an AT who was certified in 2015 or before, 50 CEUs (including at least 10 CEUs from the EBP category) are required by December 31, 2017. If you were certified in 2016, 25 CEUs (including at least 5 CEUs from the EBP category) are required by December 31, 2017Some states also require CEs with each license renewal, sometimes those including medical errors programs or attending live events. Make sure you account for these when scheduling your CE programs.

2. Find CEs that are aligned with your interests or position

For example: If you work with athletes who have prolonged symptoms after concussions, it may be beneficial to attend a seminar in which they cover sub-maximal graded treadmill exercise.

3. Look for CEs that may make you more marketable in the future

Consider taking CE programs that add to your resume and clinical tool kit. Not only may it make you a better clinician, but it may help you land a job in the future.

4. Look for CEs that may satisfy requirements for multiple certifications

If you are an AT certified as a strength and conditioning specialist, look for a class you can use for both certifications.

5. Don’t wait until the December 2017 of a reporting period to get your CEs

Don’t wait to get your CE completed. The danger of waiting until this last minute is that there may not be any classes that fit into your schedule.

6. Look for CEs your employer will reimburse

Paying for CEs can get expensive but sometimes employers will provide their employees a CE budget.

7. Use CEs as a chance to network

Think about attending a seminar that offers CEs for multiple professions (RN, PT, EMT, etc.). This will help other professionals get to know the athletic training profession.

8. Attend a National or Local Athletic Training Meeting

Get to know other ATs in your state or district. Usually these meetings offer a lot of CEs and cover topics that directly impact you.

9. Use CE Course as an Excuse to Travel

Attend a seminar or course in someplace you have never been. Plan your trip to add a day or 2 to sightsee and experience a new location.

If you’re struggling with CEUs, remember the BOC website has a list of live events and home study programs to help you meet your CE requirements. Find CEUs on the BOC website at www.bocatc.org/findCE. You can also check the career education section of the NATA website at https://www.nata.org/career-education/education/online-ceu-opportunities.

Resources

www.bocatc.org/findCE

https://www.nata.org/career-education/education/online-ceu-opportunities

About the Author

Brian Bradley has been a BOC Certified Athletic Trainer since 2008. He is originally from Lawrence, Massachusetts but now live in Orlando, Florida. Bradley earned his undergraduate degree at Merrimack College in North Andover, Massachusetts and his master’s degree at the University of Florida. Bradley has worked in a variety of settings including professional, collegiate and secondary schools and in a physical therapy clinic. He currently works at Orlando Orthopaedic Center in the durable medical equipment (DME) department.  In his spare time, Bradley spends time with his wife, Izzy, and his daughter, Abigail.  He is also a big Boston/New England fan and enjoys running.

 

 

 

Save