Archive for December, 2012

Young Professional Brief

Friday, December 21st, 2012

These question(s) identify and address the interests, needs and concerns of young athletic training professionals. Young professional Mike Hopper, ATC, has teamed up with the experience of Danielle Kleber, ATC, to highlight some of the issues young professionals find themselves dealing with early in their careers.

How do you manage to incorporate fitness into your daily life? I have found that all I feel like doing when I get off work is sleep or watch TV. Working out just does not seem important to me lately.

This has been a tough question to answer because I’ve used so many different strategies over the years and I have so many ideas to offer.  As I listed out some of my ideas, I started to notice a few common themes.

The first thing that helped me years ago was giving myself permission to accept that being an Athletic Trainer (AT) is an active job.  Lifting coolers, pushing water carts, and dragging linemen off the field is physically demanding.  Once I started giving myself some credit for what I was already doing, I felt better about the busier times when I wasn’t able to stick with a fitness routine – like during the busy football season.

Another thing to consider is that it is completely reasonable to have personal boundaries.  ATs are terrible at this concept.  We think we have to be everywhere and everything to all people, usually at the expense of our own time and sanity.  If you have found a regular time to work out, stay focused on your time.  If a coach walks in and asks you to do something, politely tell them you will be happy to do it at the end of your workout time.  If someone wants to come in for rehab, respectfully schedule them at another time.  You’ll face some kick back at first, but those around you will start to become accustomed to the fact you are just not available during that time and eventually you’ll find they stop approaching you at all.

Last, be effective with your time.  If you can kill three birds with one stone, do it.  Many times I hit the elliptical during late night winter sports practice and caught up on my reading at the same time rather than just sitting in the athletic training room waiting for something to happen.   If you spend five times a week on the treadmill for an hour each time, consider doing 30 minutes of high intensity interval training two to three times per week instead.
Find things that work for you and don’t be afraid to ask others what they do.  I guarantee that there are far more ATs that struggle with this than you think!

 

Michael Hopper, ATC, graduated with a bachelor’s degree in Health Management: Athletic Training Concentration from Southeast Missouri State University in 2010. He is a current graduate student through the University of South Florida working towards a Master’s Degree in Medical Sciences with a concentration in Athletic Training. Hopper has worked with athletes of all ages from youth sports all the way up to professional baseball and currently works for Monroe Physical Therapy and Sports Medicine in Waterloo, IL.

 

 

 

Danielle Kleber, ATC, attended the University of Nebraska at Kearney where she earned a bachelor’s degree in Fitness and Leisure Management with emphasis in Athletic Training and went on to complete her master’s coursework at the University of Nebraska at Omaha (UNO) in Fitness and Wellness Promotion.  Her professional experience includes collegiate and high school experience and she has worked with athletes at all levels of competition. Currently she works at the Director of Operations at Athletes’ Training Center, a sports performance and physical therapy facility in Omaha, NE.

We All Bleed Red

Tuesday, December 18th, 2012

Shared from the Young Professionals in the Southwest Athletic Trainers' Association blog

With the holidays around the corner, let’s take time to reflect on our personal lives and how thankful and fortunate we might be. As an Athletic Trainer (AT), we take on many responsibilities and carry out many daily duties and tasks. Most of these tasks pertain directly to our profession such as injury prevention, evaluation, rehabilitation, but sometimes we are more than just an AT. Our student athletes spend their time away from home with their peers, teachers, and coaches and most of the time we find them in the athletic training facilities whether they are injured or not.

Sometimes you may have the athlete that is always seeking medical attention for one reason or another and wonder why they are always hurt. Is this because they are really injured, are they involved in multiple sports, are they trying to get out of practice, or is it because the ATs provide an environment in which they feel safe and cared for.

Students often look up to their ATs because they feel like we are their parents away from home. They ask us for advice, they may just need someone to talk to, and they miss us when we are gone. We need to always remember, that the athlete that may drive you crazy, may live with a family member and seeking financial support from a teammate’s family. We do not always know every athlete’s home life or situation, but sometimes what they get at school is far better than what they receive at home.

So as the holiday season is taking place, remember that we are not just AT. In the student’s eyes, we are so much more.

Written By: Kristin Salinas, ATC, LAT

 

An In Depth Look with…Jarod Grace, MS, ATC

Friday, December 14th, 2012

An In Depth Look with…Jarod Grace, MS, ATC

Describe your setting:  I work in outside Sales for Medco Sports Medicine.  My territory includes traveling the states of Alabama, Florida, Mississippi and Tennessee.  My customer base is Athletic Trainers, Strength and Conditioning Coaches, and any other allied healthcare providers at the high school, college/university, professional and sports medicine outreach level.

How long have you worked in this setting? 6 months

Describe your typical day:  I begin my days early in the morning with contact to our home office in Tonawanda, NY.  I place orders and field calls from customers throughout the day, along with having face to face sales meetings with
customers in order to be an extension of their medical team.

What do you like about your position?  I love to help Athletic Trainers, Strength and Conditioning Coaches and other allied health care professionals.  I was put on this earth to serve people.  When I was a practicing AT, I was there to serve my student athletes. Now I am here to serve health care professionals by finding out their needs and providing value add service.  At Medco, we have the widest sports medicine product selection and the Performance Plus catalog which features strength, conditioning, and fitness equipment.   Medco is a great company to work for and we are the only distributor that is a BOC Approved Provider of free CEUs at www.medco-athletics.com.  Another thing that I enjoy is getting out and  seeing other people’s ways of doing things. I can then share these ideas with other healthcare professionals and be a resource for their practitioner needs.

What do you dislike about your position?  I recently began my professional sales career with Medco Sports Medicine and I am thoroughly enjoying the variety of experiences that each day brings.

What advice do you have about your practice setting for a young Athletic Trainer looking at this setting?  It is helpful to have a strong work ethic so that you can provide excellent customer service.  This job is great because it provides schedule flexibility which is good for my family life.  If you have an athletic training or strength and conditioning background, this setting provides a solid foundation for an exciting medical career.

12 Ways to Market the BOC Credential

Wednesday, December 12th, 2012

You’ve worked hard to earn your credential, now show it off and promote the profession with others. In recognition of 12/12/2012, the BOC has twelve ways to help you market the BOC credential. You can Be Certain.™ that we are here to support you and answer your questions. We stand behind you and your ATC® credential.

1.) Publicize your status as an AT by sending a press release to your local newspaper. Visit the BOC website to see a sample. Please call (877) 262-3926 ext. 117 or email BrittneyR@bocatc.org if you wish to request an official press release on BOC letterhead.

2.) Announce your accomplishment to friends, family and followers via Twitter and other social media. Be Certain.™ to connect with the BOC on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and YouTube.

3.) Read and comment on the BOC blog.

4.) Purchase or download the Role Delineation Study/Practice Analysis, Sixth Edition.

5.) Learn about NCCA accreditation. The BOC is the only accredited AT certification program in the US. The BOC has been accredited by the NCCA since 1982 by demonstrating compliance with strict accreditation standards.

6.) Utilize NATA reference documents about the profession such as Tips for the New Secondary School Athletic Trainer.

7.) Order  a plaque or graphically designed certificate with gold embossed BOC logo and seal of certification to proudly display your BOC certification.

8.) Use proper terminology when talking about the profession with the public, such as using Certified Athletic Trainer instead of “Trainer” and Athletic Training Facility instead of Athletic Training Room. Also read about the proper treatment of degrees, licenses and credentials.

9.) Speak at a high school career fair and educate prospective students about the profession.

10.) Present to Parent Teacher Organizations, Booster Clubs etc. about the expertise ATs have in reducing risk and saving lives.

11.) Speak to the directors of hiring or personnel to help them understand your education and training and the importance of hiring a certified and licensed AT.  This will allow them to target ATs and correctly write position announcements.

12.) Respond to the media when “trainer” is used and exemplify your role as an Athletic Trainer when you have opportunities with the media.  This is a great opportunity to educate them.

Written By: Brittney Ryba
BrittneyR@bocatc.org

Young Professional Brief

Friday, December 7th, 2012

These question(s) identify and address the interests, needs and concerns of young athletic training professionals. Young professional Mike Hopper, ATC, has teamed up with the experience of Danielle Kleber, ATC, to highlight some of the issues young professionals find themselves dealing with early in their careers.

What is one injury that you struggled with early in your career and how have you managed to conquer that struggle?

When I first started to practice I struggled with back injuries.  I knew enough to know that when student-athletes couldn’t sleep at night or I had a young, healthy athlete complaining of back pain like someone my parent’s age might, something probably wasn’t right.

Early in my career I figured I could go one of two routes with these types of injuries.  I could learn it and master it or I could network with someone who had already learned and mastered it.

I am aware enough of my weaknesses to know that I struggle with conceptual thinking and that type of thinking is a major piece to understanding back anatomy and the movements that occur in that area.  I also knew that professionally, I had
interest in other areas and didn’t have an innate desire to dive into learning everything I could about backs.  Most importantly, I had the wise advice of a mentor who had told me, “you can’t master everything so know your limits and know when ou need to ask for help.”

That left me with the option of finding someone who was good at evaluating and treating back injuries. Thankfully, my first job landed me side by side someone who had an amazing understanding of the back and a gift for treating those cases.  He was my go to person in that area.  Since then, I have made sure I always have someone in my back pocket, so to speak, that I can consult or refer to in this area.

Sure, I’ve picked some things up along the way in relation to back injuries and feel more confident in treating them, but I still prefer to let someone who is an expert in that area be the quarterback and lead the way.

 

Michael Hopper, ATC, graduated with a bachelor’s degree in Health Management: Athletic Training Concentration from Southeast Missouri State University in 2010. He is a current graduate student through the University of South Florida working towards a Master’s Degree in Medical Sciences with a concentration in Athletic Training. Hopper has worked with athletes of all ages from youth sports all the way up to professional baseball and currently works for Monroe Physical Therapy and Sports Medicine in Waterloo, IL.

 

 

 

Danielle Kleber, ATC, attended the University of Nebraska at Kearney where she earned a bachelor’s degree in Fitness and Leisure Management with emphasis in Athletic Training and went on to complete her master’s coursework at the University of Nebraska at Omaha (UNO) in Fitness and Wellness Promotion.  Her professional experience includes collegiate and high school experience and she has worked with athletes at all levels of competition. Currently she works at the Director of Operations at Athletes’ Training Center, a sports performance and physical therapy facility in Omaha, NE.

Transition from Candidate to Athletic Trainer

Wednesday, December 5th, 2012

This Week’s Question: I just passed the BOC exam! What is the next step?

Answer: Passing the BOC exam is just the first step. There are a few items you must submit to complete your file for certification before you can officially use the ATC® credential. Be Certain.™ that the following items have been submitted to complete your file for certification:

Official transcript – Mail your official transcript with degree and date of degree posted (upon graduation) in a university sealed envelope to:

Board of Certification
Attn: Credentialing Services Dept.
1415 Harney St Ste 200
Omaha NE 68102-2205

ECC card – A front and back signed copy of your current ECC card must be faxed or scanned and emailed to:

Fax: (402) 561-0598 (Attn: Credentialing Services Dept.)
Email: Exam@bocatc.org

You will receive an email notification that everything has been processed and that you have the go-ahead to use the credential. You can publicize your status as a BOC Certified Athletic Trainer (AT) by sending a press release to
your local newspaper or by posting it on Twitter. We also have certificates and plaques you can order to display your accomplishment. Visit the BOC website about more ideas on how to market your BOC certification.

For more information regarding the maintenance of your BOC certification and other responsibilities, read Transition from Candidate to AT  on the BOC website. We encourage you to watch the short video Your Credential, Your Responsibility on the BOC’s YouTube Channel.

Currently, there are 48 states that have some form of athletic training regulation. The BOC exam is accepted to obtain regulation in all 48 states; however, it is important to recognize that passing the BOC exam is only a precursor to athletic training practice. Compliance with state regulatory requirements is mandatory and the only avenue to legal athletic training practice. For specific details regarding state regulation, please contact your state regulatory agency.

When using the credential, remember that ATC refers to the credential held by a Certified Athletic Trainer (AT). ATC should only be used when referring to the credential, and it should not be used in singular or plural form (ATC or ATCs) when referring to an individual Athletic Trainer (AT) or a group of Athletic Trainers (ATs). Read more about the proper presentation of credentials, degrees and licenses in this NATA News article Proper Treatment of Degrees, Licenses and Credentials.

Written By: Brittney Ryba
BrittneyR@bocatc.org